Photograph kids - meet photographer Anna Jansohn and get hold of her 3 best tips on how to

Kids are always present yet always on the run with all their own will and emotions leading the way. To capture them on camera is as fun as it is challenging and one can never predict the results. We teamed up with photographer Anna Jansohn to get hold of her best thoughts and tips regarding photography in general and the art of photographing kids in particularly.

Jag vill gärna läsa artikeln på svenska, tack!

  Photo: Alla photos are taken by Anna Jansohn if nothing else is stated

Photo: Alla photos are taken by Anna Jansohn if nothing else is stated

 

This is @annajansohn

Anna is a versatile, talented and inspiring woman, juggling many balls in the air. She has a bachelor’s degree in communication, is working as a freelance photographer and studying to become a nurse while nursing her two kids. A mixture of artistry, sharpness and human presence is shining through her photography and her Instagram feed as a whole. Anna is mastering the art of capturing emotions in her photos and is mainly doing weddings and family portraits. With such a phenomenal imagery we’d like to know a lot more about it. What’s the secret behind? And how can we master to capture a wild kid on camera?

 Photo: Sanna Brage

Photo: Sanna Brage

Anna has always been interested in photography but it wasn’t until recently the interest got hold of her for real and, believe it or not, she bought her first proper camera this winter to start make a living from her photography. To Anna it’s not about creating a perfect, technical photo but rather to capture that fantastic photo emotionally.

“It’s about the feeling you get when the light, focus and all emotions are dancing together and you feel like ‘yes, we nailed it’. It does not have to be perfect, it’s about capturing those exact emotions. It’s a big but fun challenge and a fantastic feeling when everything just comes together and I manage to give my clients just that - the right feel of emotions.

fotografera_barn_annajansohn_framkalla.jpg

“I mainly find inspiration from other photographers, but also from movies, art, fashion and tv. There are so many well-made tv series these days with fantastic imagery. I love the perfection of imperfection and the very personal vibe in it.

 Anna is a master of shape and colour, mixing the simple with the playful, the stripped with the luridly.

Anna is a master of shape and colour, mixing the simple with the playful, the stripped with the luridly.

The love for and the art of photographing kids

A consistent theme in her photography is natural lights and natural environments. There’s not a single photo captured in a studio, so her thoughts and tips regarding photographing kids is highly relevant even to all of us non professionals and we’re really happy that she’s sharing.

“I guess my way of photography works when it comes to kid photography and kids often like to get their photos taken by me since they don’t have to sit still. Rather the opposite, I let them run around and play the way they like and it’s my task to capture them in the moment. I think that’s the best way to do it since it reflects life the way it is.

Tip 1. Photograph in natural environments and tag along with the kids on their terms

Try to capture your kids in their most natural selfes. Explore light and angels from were they are and move around the kids rather than trying to direct them. Never force them to act in a way that’s not natural, it will never produce a natural photo.

annajansohn-2.jpg

“Photographing kids is a real challenge in the sense that they’re nothing like adults. But in the same way, that’s what is so fantastic about kids, they’re always themselves. Their personality shines through adding that special touch to every photo. When I photograph families it’s never getting stiff just because of that. I love challenges and trust me, it’s very challenging photographing kids.

Another good advice is to adapt to your kids natural needs for food and sleep. Tireadand hungry kids will never be cooperative. Make sure to interlude every now and then, bring some fruits and drinks and always bring some extra clothing.

Tip 2. Don’t set the bar to high

“Take everything as it comes and for what it is. Talk to the kids if they’re old enough rather than talking above them. Also make sure they know what’s going on and what’s about to happen. If you presuppose that anything can happen and that whatever happens will be, then it will probably turn out perfectly fine. And kids are smart, they can sense both pressure and stress from parents, so my advice is to always try to have fun and enjoy the moment together. Then the photos will follow automatically.

annajansohn_fotografera-barn_framkalla_bilder.jpg

Tip 3. Bribes are okey!

As well as mobile phones, Anna argues while telling us about plenty of photos that turned out very nice and emotional when a kid is looking at a screen without the screen being visible in the photo. The most important thing is to make the kid feel like you’re playing, turning it into a joyful moment.

photograph_kids_photo_tips_printing
photograph_kids_tips_iphone.jpg
 

To find the right feel

The hard work is not only the actual capturing, but rather the process of choosing the best photos and then give them the right feel with editing.

“If light is the vital thing for the actual photo, then editing is vital for that special feel. I modify my editing technique often but I’ve started to find what works and feels good for me now. If I’d edit solely in my iPhone, I’d recommend the VSCO app. It’s super easy to use with loads of pre-sets, filters and tools for simple yet powerful editing. Experiment with different filters and go for the one you like the most.

photograph_kids_edit_tips.jpg

And to evoke that feel in print

When the hard work of selection and editing is done, there’s only one more task left: to decide which photos are to be turned into prints. ‘Cause isn’t it something very special about getting your favourite photos off your device and into your life? We really do think so. And so does Anna:

“To see a special moment turned into a physical product, to hold a memory in your hand or decorate a wall with it, that’s really something.

So THANK YOU! Anna, for your invaluable tips and for inspiring us with a lively, present and tender imagery from every day life, every day. We’ll keep on follow your every photo.

Say hi to Anna

Would you like to get in contact with Anna or find out if she’s the right photographer for you? Visit her website or Instagram, and make sure to follow her for a daily dose of warmth and inspiration.

Don’t have the app yet? No problem: